'Deadpool' 4K HDR Demo with Director Tim Miller

Social Site Sharing Tool



'Deadpool' 4K HDR Demo with Director Tim Miller Author Topic: 'Deadpool' 4K HDR Demo with Director Tim Miller  (Read 742 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline DCI forum

'Deadpool' 4K HDR Demo with Director Tim Miller
'Deadpool' 4K HDR Demo with Director Tim Miller
« on: Mon June 06, 2016, 05:16:25 AM »
Posted Fri May 20, 2016 at 09:15 AM PDT by Michael S. Palmer
Fox Innovatin Lab logo (small slide)
This is my final 'Deadpool' post this week, I swear!

After getting some hands on time with the stunning 'Deadpool' Ultra HD Blu-ray (and the very strong Blu-ray) over the previous weekend, our friends at the Fox Innovation Lab invited journalists for a direct UHD vs HD demonstration. Unlike our previous demo, this time we were treated to consumer grade encodes as both the HD and UHD sources played on IDENTICAL Samsung Ultra HD displays.

Hashtag: Science!

For an in-depth understanding as to how this demo went, please check out the video portions of my Ultra HD Blu-ray and Blu-ray reviews.

The short version is this: the Ultra HD Blu-ray absolutely CRUSHES the Blu-ray in side-by-side comparisons. To be fair, this effect wanes slightly in A-to-B comparisons with any sort of time delay, so don't feel too bad if you haven't upgraded yet. But side-by-side? Shoot. This is the release the earlier adopters have been waiting for. The Ultra HD offers deeper black levels, more vivid colors (hello, red!), and oodles of added highlight and CGI detail. I was really impressed.

To help take us through what we were observing on the two displays, 'Deadpool' director, Tim Miller, as well as the film's colorist, Tim Stipan, lead a panel discussion moderated by Schawn Belston, EVP of Media and Library Services, Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment, where they chatted about their post-production process, the benefits of HDR, and answered a few questions.

The entire panel is a little too long to transcribe here, so what I've done is broken down key information using direct quotes. Enjoy!

Our Demo Setup
Schawn Belstin: These are two identical monitors that have been calibrated to match each other. The content on one is HD, standard dynamic range, compressed the same way it is on the Blu-ray. And on the other monitor is the HDR 4K compressed the same way it is on the UHD disc.

Two Firsts for Fox Ultra HD Blu-ray
Schawn Belstin: This is our first disc that features all HDR content, so the menus and logos and everything are in HDR. Also, object-based audio. Dolby Atmos is on the entire disc. This might not seem like that big a deal, but trust me when I say it was. We had to re-imagine all of our technical work flows behind the scenes to make this actually possible. To give you an example, we spent two months rendering and re-rendering, trying to figure out the best way to render the Fox logo in 4K, in open EXR, to get the most out of this HDR experience, and that was just the logo. So you can imagine what goes into an entire movie. But you didn't come here to hear me talk about the logo so let's get to the movie.

Deadpool's Multiple DI Timeline
Tim Stipan: First we did the normal theatre pass, which is called P3 color space. Concurrently we also did two version of IMAX; we did a Xenon bulb and then we did a laser pass also. Then, actually, we did the Rec 709 HD pass. And then we did the HDR pass.

Tim Miller: Actually, so it's six if you count that, because then we did the Dolby [Vision] pass.

Tim Stipan: Oh, yeah, I almost forgot that. I felt like every time we were going through it we were seeing more and more and more. And the last pass that we did was the [UHD Blu-ray] HDR pass, which you are seeing here, and we were just like, "wow, gosh, we wish we had that at the beginning because you're not seeing so much detail in the skies and flames and Colossus and Deadpool's suit." Things of that nature. [HDR] allowed me to be better at my job because I could see more color information, I could match things better. By seeing all that extra color information and detail, I felt like I was doing a better job being a colorist. I felt a lot of shots now had this painterly quality to them, which I didn't quite notice as much when we were doing the normal theatrical color grade.

'Deadpool' UHD HDR Demo at the Fox Innovation Lab

HDR First Impressions
Tim Miller: For a first-time filmmaker every time I walked into DI, I'd get to see it on a big screen, thinking to myself, "I made a movie, fuck yeah!" [laughter] And then for this last pass they brought me in and sat me down in front of a monitor and I'm like, "well I've done this before..." But then it started playing and I truly thought it was the best looking -- format and display medium aside -- it's the best looking version of the movie by far.

Tim Stipan: Yeah, the amount of detail you get in flames. You see so much more of actual flame. I wouldn't say [SDR] looked like a 2D image, but all of a sudden [with HDR] it has extra dimension to it, it's almost like 3D.

HDR Extra Detail
Tim Miller: Having done DIs for four different outputs, the Ultra HD is just fucking amazing at the level of detail. Especially since we did it at the end of the process. Especially the skies is where I noticed it most. In a lot of the shots, particularly on the freeway fight, there is just so much more detail. It's like suddenly the sky was not a white mass the way it had been in all the other formats. Also Deadpool's costume was the other big thing I noticed. It's got a really fine weave to it and, suddenly, all the detail in that costume comes out in a way that turns to mush in all the other formats. And VFX too. Explosions, fires, things like that, the fight in the lab looks particularly cool in this super high res format.

Tim Stipan: We're taking advantage of the camera. The camera captures this and now with HDR you're allowed to see what the camera's actually capturing.

HDR's Effect on Filmmaking
Tim Miller: We shot ['Deadpool' in] 3K on the Alexa. If we shot in 6K, which is the newer stuff, or I could have shot on the RED, how much better would this [Ultra HD Blu-ray with HDR / WCG] look there? Where [the Blu-ray] wouldn't benefit from the extra resolution, [the Ultra HD Blu-ray] would. So aside from all the other compositional benefits, from being able to fuck around with framing, I think we'll get a huge bump in the level of detail. But to answer your question, [HDR] would probably have a negative effect on the filmmaking process because suddenly I'd be less forgiving about all that shit I know were going to see in the background.

Tim Stipan: The thing I keep thinking about is the faces ... I think this happened when HD first came out is that people were all of a sudden saying, "we gotta put extra makeup on". That would be my only concern with HDR, but otherwise all the extra detail you're seeing is a huge benefit.

HDR vs CGI
Tim Miller: It could help or hurt depending on how good the CG is. If it didn't integrate well, it would excentuate ... and just more clearly illuminate where you fucked up.

HDR vs SDR Color Timing Differences
Tim Stipan: It was something that just happened. We saw [the big explosion during the film's climax] in HDR and there was more of a boldness, more detail to it. It's not that we didn't like what we did in the SDR version, but the HDR version looked great and we were like, "let's go with it." Could we have tweaked the SDR to get it closer to the HDR, yes, but it still wouldn't have the detail because there is a difference between the color of the flames.

Tim Miller: But don't you just have more range to work with [in HDR]? If you had gone after that in [SDR], it would have fucked up other things.

Tim Stipan: It's not something we were isolating. We didn't isolate the flames, but once we color corrected the image, they kinda fell into place.

Thanks again to the Fox Innovation Lab for the invite. It's great to know, outside of our home theatre geek circles, filmmakers are as excited about this new format's capabilities as we are. Because, at the end of the day, HDR means audiences are experiencing more of a film's production than ever before.

And for Heaven's sake, people, don't just sit there reading this, go check out the 'Deadpool' Ultra HD Blu-ray for yourselves... OR, if you're reading this on or before May 22, 2016, enter for a chance to WIN A FREE copy from your buds here at High-Def Digest.

Linkback: http://dci-forum.com/dcinema-general-forum/3/deadpool-4k-hdr-demo-director-tim-miller/800/

Offline DCI forum

'Deadpool' 4K HDR Demo with Director Tim Miller
Deadpool director says HDR is the real killer feature for 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray
« Reply #1 on: Mon June 06, 2016, 05:19:11 AM »
Deadpool director says HDR is the real killer feature for 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray
By Stephen Lambrechts 12 days ago Home cinema 

It's not just the language that's colourful
Few comic book characters are as colourful as Deadpool, with his rapier wit, constant swearing, penchant for violent blood-letting, fourth-wall-breaking shenanigans and, of course, that bright red suit. Long considered a tough sell in Hollywood, the 'merc with a mouth' has finally been captured in all his glory by director Tim Miller in the hugely successful movie, Deadpool.

The film is so good, it immediately made it into techradar's (somewhat) prestigious best superhero films of all time list. Take that, Wolverine!

As we head toward Deadpool's 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray release, director Tim Miller and colorist Tim Stipan stopped by Fox's Innovation Lab to demonstrate and chat about the disc's visual presentation — in particular, the ways in which high dynamic-range (HDR) has been utilised to make the film even more vibrant and explosive than it was in theatres.

Schawn Belston, EVP of Media and Library Services at 20th Century Fox, also chimed in on what it took to make Deadpool shine for its home release.

"We had to reimagine all our technical workflows behind the scenes to make this actually possible," said Belston, stating that "even the logo, for example, we spent more than two months rendering and re-rendering, trying to figure out the best way to render the logo, in 4K, in [Industrial Light & Magic's HDR file format] OpenEXR, to get the most out of this high dynamic-range experience."

Deadpool
Visual effects veteran Miller, who made his feature-film directing debut with Deadpool, was impressed by what colorist Stipan managed to come up with while producing different outputs of the film for other formats.

"I felt like every time we were going through it, we were seeing more and more and more," said Stipan. "The last pass that we did was the HDR pass, and we were just like 'wow, we wish we had that in the beginning', because you could all of a sudden see so much more detail in the skies, or the flames, or Colossus or Deadpool's suit."

Stipan elaborated, "for me, what I loved about it, is it allowed me to be better at my job, because I could see more colour and could match things better, and if I'd seen all that extra colour information and detail, I just think I'd be doing a better job as a colorist and matching shots and grading that look."

Miller agreed. "The Ultra HD is f***ing amazing in the level of detail, especially because we did it at the end of the process," said Miller, pointing to the film as it played on a curved Samsung SUHD television beside him.

"Especially in the skies is where I noticed it most," said Miller. "Particularly in the freeway fight, there's just so much more detail; it's like suddenly the sky was not a white mass the way it had been in all the other formats."

Deadpool
Having tested the 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray release extensively, we have to agree – what were once mostly white and grey skies now shine through with streaks of blue peeking through the clouds, themselves now showing much more definition.

Of course, it's Deadpool's costume, so wonderfully faithful to Rob Liefeld's original comic design, that would be the major selling point of this release. While many of the film's action scenes have a steely grey sheen to them, Deadpool's vibrant (but still dirty) red and black costume always manages to steal your attention.

"Deadpool's costume was the other big thing I noticed. It's got a really fine weave to it, and suddenly, all the detail of the costume comes out in a way that turns to mush in all the other formats."

Miller noted that "explosions, fires, things like that" also benefitted greatly from HDR's much wider colour gamut. Stipan described the flames in the film's laboratory fight sequence as "all of a sudden having dimension to it – it almost becomes 3D," rather than looking like "a flat TV image."

With regards to specular highlights, which are the bright spots of light that appear on shiny, reflective objects, Miller revealed that HDR allowed for greater detail in the scenes that featured the massive metal mutant, Colossus, citing that in other forms, the character's shine "fuzzes out to a glowing spot."

Deadpool
Miller also believes that "having that detail in there makes it less distracting, because there's not this giant element sitting on the screen; it's this nuanced element that fits will all the rest of the visual details a lot better than if it's just a blob of colour."

According to Miller, working in the HDR process has opened his eyes to possibilities of what he and his team could achieve on the next Deadpool film. "We shot 3K on the Alexa. If we'd shot 6K, which is the newer stuff which we could've shot on RED, how much better would this look?" Said Miller. "Where [the normal Blu-ray version] I don't think would benefit from that extra resolution, this [new Ultra HD] format would."

"The most important thing is people's faces, you know, the makeup," expressed Miller, explaining that "it's not like when HD first came out that people were all of a sudden like 'Oh gosh, we've got to put extra makeup on,' but that would be my only concern with HDR, otherwise, all this, the difference that you're seeing is a huge benefit for us."

Though HDR is becoming instrumental in how filmmakers approach their material, it's clear that it's still considered a very new technology in Hollywood.

"From all the filmmakers that I've worked with, and have been talking to about HDR, no one is bringing an HDR monitor on set," explained Miller, citing their expense as the reason. "If one of those gets knocked over, that's like a $30,000 mistake."

Deadpool
"I'm not sure what we would gain out of it, other than us looking at the raw output on a monitor," said Miller. "If the detail is there, then Tim [Stipan] is going to be able to do something with it in post."

For Stipan, the best part was being able to utilise all the information that was captured by the cameras in the first place.

"There's this extra detail we're taking advantage of. The camera captured this. So now, with this HDR here, allowing us to see what the camera's actually captured, I've got to admit, I was really disappointed, because it was the last pass we did," laughed Stipan.

That disappointment didn't last long, though, with Stipan admitting that "you start playing, and you see this detail, and I truly thought it was the best-looking — format aside and display medium aside — it was the best-looking version of the movie by far."


xx
4K HDR TV reviews

Started by DCI forum on Dcinema General Forum

8 Replies
2213 Views
Last post Fri July 08, 2016, 08:38:20 AM
by DCI forum
xx
MediaTek talks about 4K and HDR

Started by DCI forum on Dcinema General Forum

0 Replies
546 Views
Last post Mon June 06, 2016, 05:34:04 AM
by DCI forum
xx
A look at the proposed distribution methods for HDR

Started by DCI forum on Dcinema General Forum

1 Replies
1417 Views
Last post Mon May 30, 2016, 03:11:38 AM
by DCI forum
xx
Sixth rework of Braveheart; 'I saw things in doing the HDR that I’ve never seen'

Started by DCI forum on Dcinema General Forum

0 Replies
542 Views
Last post Tue June 28, 2016, 04:07:14 AM
by DCI forum
xx
Implementing HDR in ‘Rise of the Tomb Raider’

Started by DCI forum on Dcinema General Forum

0 Replies
532 Views
Last post Mon June 06, 2016, 05:43:14 AM
by DCI forum